PLENTY TO SAY

With little over a month to go until we launch NOTHING TO SAY onto the world, and just 3 days until you can pre-order the books, we thought you migt like to meet our writers. Sort of like canapes. So we asked them all some questions, and here are some answers, in absolutely no order and with as little editorial control placed on formatting as possible.

final poster

Penny Goring

1.       The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is blue

2.       The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be blue

3.       100 years from now I will be remembered as blue

4.       We think far too little about blue

5.       What is there too much of in the arts? eulb

6.       An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history? blue

7.       Care to elaborate on that? blue blue

8.       If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called? blue

9.       There should be an app for blue

10.   There should never be an app for blue

Howie Good

1.       The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is

Paperless publishing

2.       The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

 The  continuing disappearance of intelligent life on earth

3.       100 years from now I will be remembered as

 A curmudgeon

4.       We think far too little about

 Ethics

5.       What is there too much of in the arts?

Pretentiousness

6.       An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

The former, though I’d be sorely tempted by the latter.

7.       Care to elaborate on that?

I’m not the forgiving type.

8.       If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

 Wang Dang Doodle Press

9.       There should be an app for

Wang Dang Doodle Press

10.   There should never be an app for

Childbirth

Eleanor Leone Bennett

1.       The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is
More people are given a voice and we have a lot more opportunity to be seen.

Self publishing is very exciting and is a wonderful chance to break tradition in what we have all been reading for centuries.

2.       The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

Original thought and fresh ways in which to deliver our creative stock.

3.       100 years from now I will be remembered as

Someone who worked too hard on no sleep and a stubborn person who had to be a part of everything creative happening anywhere.

4.       We think far too little about

Other people’s welfare globally and we tend to think protests as a human race are done after so long and so many achievements. There will always be better treatment available for people that rightly deserve it.

A mark of successful people is that they are not satisfied with how far they may have come.

Maybe a mark for a successful human race is that we will never stop until we have true balance and the strongest voices will constantly speak up in aid of those too frightened to speak.

5.       What is there too much of in the arts?

conformity

6.       An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

I think that is the finest question I have been asked as an artist.

I think for the second option there is no one person I can damage so much that will help anyone else – for the fact is for me to hate them they have to be in common knowledge as already hate worthy and in the case of murders I can not help the victims – the room does not give me a tardis to go back and save anyone.

So I will pick the first one, give me the most iconic powerful person who can do the most good and lets have a chin-wag and maybe become friends and maybe let me do some brain picking and maybe have me make suggestions, make a few things better one step at a time.

7.       Care to elaborate on that?

You win more flies with honey than with vinegar? and I would really hate for everyone to remember me as someone good at torturing criminals.

8.       If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

minding reality press

9.       There should be an app for

finding artist/photographer guidelines for EVERY publishing house and magazine in the world, haha I would adore that.

10.   There should never be an app for

finding where you can buy the cheapest publishing rights to a certain photograph by typing in keywords.

P A Levy

-1- The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is

We stand at the forefront of the digital revolution. In the decades to come, the relationship we’ve had with books, over the past centuries will change, there’s no point trying to pretend otherwise.  Books will become the new vinyl.  But we find ourselves at the dawn of a new media that hasn’t yet even began to explore its limits.  Hopefully the printed word will survive, although I can see that developing into a special art form; a craft, a new Kelmscott.  For the electronic book … the horizon shimmers in infinity.

-2- The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

preventing your readers from living in your fiction and keeping them safe in the real world.

-3- 100 years from now I will be remembered as

a twat with dodgy legs.

-4- We think far too little about

homeless snails

-5- What is there too much of in the arts?

snail shells

-6- An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

Tough decision but, on reflection, the toys of the second option are too tempting.

-7- Care to elaborate on that?

When meeting your icons, you’re running the risk of a huge disappointment.  On the other hand, the chance to release so much pent-up anger and frustration on some one you hate with such an array of wonderful toys.  Deep joy.  Then again, if your icon takes you somewhere with a jazz saxophonist, and serves you a glass of banana flavoured vomit with a straw that could make you hate them.  So could be a combination of both.

-8- If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

I put all work under the umbrella of the Clueless Collective, as ‘the Clueless Collective’s Collected Press’, so I suspect ‘Clueless’ would feature, and, would no doubt be so apt.  A couple of years ago we did produce a magazine called ‘Spudgun’, but found our vision for it wasn’t being matched by the submissions we were receiving, so we’ve held back on issue #2.

-9- There should be an app for

spotting trainspotters with acne and polka dot underwear, or kitten cuddles.

-10- There should never be an app for

DIY  OCD

C R Bliss

1. The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is it’s paper extinction and its confinement to immortality in the electronic sarcophagus known as the micro-chip.

2. The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be condensing all literature, past, present and future, onto the head of a pin, and then sticking that pin into the world’s largest voodoo doll which stands on the world’s largest paper book made from 1000s of recycled books.

3. 100 years from now I will be remembered as a false prophet slowly turning into oil for rogue terrorist states that dare overthrow our future great overlords, China and Tahiti.

4. We think far too little about the science of burning witches on Mars.

5. What is there too much of in the arts? Jonquils.

6. An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?  The Marquis de Sade and the Marquis de Sade.

7. Care to elaborate on that? He’s the only one I know of who would most likely be interested in both a banana smoothie and a blowtorch.  Like me.

8. If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?  Love My Annotated Obscenity.

9. There should be an app for creating your own religion.

10. There should never be an app for creating your own religion.

A M Ringwald

  1. The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is also the most daunting, and that is the massive amount of people who are now contributing to the literary scene, namely online. It seems that with the internet came a boom in authors, publishers, and venues for both negative and positive exposure. Writers are, of course, greedy for recognition, lustful for acclaim. There are brilliant and mediocre publications. There’s a whole new sea of knowledge and pretense to filter through. Regardless of the inevitable stresses that puts on someone looking for publication, the options are limitless. The writing is limitless. The people to meet, to connect with, are everywhere. In many ways (& for better or worse) we are freer to express ourselves. Maybe it’s as simple as the more, the merrier?
  2. Innovation is a timeless challenge and as such it will continue to haunt literary hopefuls and masters alike. Innovation invites both failure and delight. It’s a lovely, lovely temptress, and we’ll never know if we won it over, if we did it right.
  3. Oh man, I hope I’m remembered for empathy and tenacity. For writing something big.
  4. We think too much about ourselves and we don’t try hard enough or genuinely enough to change it.
  5. Vanity! Arrogance! Self-endowed entitlement!  Worse yet: we’re all privy to it.
  6. If the banana smoothie can actually be a mango smoothie, then I’m game.
  7. Well, I do co-run an online literary magazine called Caffeine Dirge, if that counts! Reader-of-this, you should submit something to our first issue!
  8. There should be an app for how to drive a car. Or an app that would actually drive a car for its owner. That would be useful. I can’t drive far without accidentally risking my life.
  9. Good question, homie.

Sian S Rathore

1.       The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is

The internet. Absolutely. I know this is such a ridiculously vague answer but I love what the internet is doing for literature – not only in terms of distribution but its role in creative content full stop. Flarf image macros are one of my favourite forms of poetry and it can be done so finely. I love the alt lit movement and that could only exist with the internet and the millennial apathy we all seem to share. I love how 21st century literature is so divisive; people are getting angry that people are writing about / utilising the internet. I like that people passionately hate and stand in the way of improvement, and what I love most about 21st century literature is how much it pisses off traditionalists.

2.       The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

I cannot answer that question as I cannot imagine what MacBook Pros will look like in the 22nd century.

3.       100 years from now I will be remembered as

Someone who moaned a lot, probably. Someone who had a lot of problems with things and probably, unless people start changing their ways of seeing, just another madwoman poet.

4.       We think far too little about

The importance of progression in general. I think sometimes the immediacy of the internet and the overwhelmingly positive reactions within the alternative literature scene, a lot of people have sort of given up trying. I wish that people who dedicated their lives to cultural or artistic pursuits really did try that little bit harder. You should never be very happy with what you’ve written. It’s possible to be happy with your work in reference to other works you yourself have produced, but when you start thinking you can just spew out a poem without really caring about its intention or giving any thought whatsoever to its craft then you might as well just give up. That’s not to say I’m against the conceptual: I love it, I’m one of those people who loves the kind of art which is just a brick in a room or whatever. So long as I know why that brick’s there, what that brick represents, what the process of putting the brick in the room means, what it’s a metaphor for, or even why it’s not a metaphor for anything and just a brick – I’m happy with it just being a brick in a room. However if you put a brick in a room and make a big deal about how clever you are for doing so, just give up now and go get a normal job. Become a bricklayer, perhaps.

5.       What is there too much of in the arts?

Middle class white people having sex. Also, elitism. My god, is there elitism. Especially in literature, we are living in an age where the publishers we once knew as innovative and independent are more and more about just publishing books by their mates. There are very few “mainstream” writers or writers who have “made it” that i actually like. I feel like there are 2 main indie publishers in Britain and one of them no longer accept any kind of unsolicited manuscript or proposal any more (and when I asked the editor why they removed this option from their guidelines he said: “We got good 😉 ” which was pretty risible, wouldn’t you say?), and another one has stopped taking risks in favour of instead putting work out by people they go drinking with. A lot of poetry in Britain is about lacking innovation and writing what is expected of you, and being friends with / sleeping with the right people. There are a lot of really ghastly people in British poetry, there are a lot of people I’d hate to even spend 5 minutes with. I think when you go into the arts you are already placing yourself in an elite position and you need to accept that to be the case. What you shouldn’t do is join the insular world of the circle-jerking mainstreamers, don’t be a poet merely by kissing the arses of those you want to be as successful as, and don’t see your poetry as a commodity. Instead if you’re going to go into the arts you should go into it desperately wanting to do something new and different. You should be dissatisfied if anything you do even seems slightly derivative (if not parody or pastiche). You should be annoyed with yourself if you know you’re being lazy with your writing and your ambitions should be to change something, to be something new. Don’t let your ambitions be to make lots of money because you won’t. Don’t let your ambitions be to have success but lack integrity. I think if you do that, you’re part of the problem, and you’re the reason people distrust the arts.

6.       An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

As the past couple of questions have shown you, I have enough bile in my life. I’d definitely pick the first. Besides, Margaret Thatcher is finally dead now anyway, thank fuck.

7.       Care to elaborate on that?

The Thatcher comment, well I found her disgusting. The comment about wanting to be in the cafe with a smoothie and listening to jazz – I’d much rather. My personal hero is unfortunately dead. She was Trish Keenan, the singer from Broadcast, and I sorely wish there was just a way I could have met her before she tragically died young. She wasn’t a poet, I have a lot of poets that I very much admire but none of my personal heroes are poets. If I met Trish Keenan I’d ask her about all the things that interest me the most: automatic writing, trance, ceremony, rituals, the paranormal in the arts, everything. What a brilliant person she was. I’m still always so sad she died.

8.       If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

Sadcore Dadwave, of course, after the night / zine / FRANCHISE that me I run.

9.       There should be an app for

Fucking everything, I love technology and anything it can do to make my life easier is a bonus. I so dislike those who make a point of being poets but being like “Oh i find Kindles so beastly” or those writers who feel like they need to tell every single person in the world that they do most of their writing on a typewriter or with a fucking antique quill (NB – I own both a typewriter and an antique quill but this is besides the point, I at least admit that I’m a poser). I use the Poetry Foundation app to read poetry on the go, and I use Evernote to make notes that get synced to a cloud that i can access from any machine capable of connecting to the internet. I do most of my writing directly on my MacBook. I love all the apps. All the social networks.

10.   There should never be an app for

I can’t even think of a thing there shouldn’t be an app for. Maybe anything to do with bodily functions, I am terribly squeamish with that stuff.

Andy Harrod

1.       The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is

Technology, for example, the internet and ebooks, and the opportunity this provides to read and hear voices that would otherwise be hidden and lost. Whilst 99% of writers who use blogs and ebooks to reach readers for their writing are probably still likely to remain only known by a few people, they will be known by readers who appreciate their writing. For me that appreciation is worth more than money, whilst you cannot live off it, it does sustain a more fulfilling life.

More importantly, to me, there is also the opportunity for literature to be recognised as art and for writers to take risks that traditional publishing would run miles from. Again these risks may not make money, but I do not see that as the purpose of art. Instead I feel art is about offering alternatives, challenges and a sense of what it means to be alive, the struggle and the joy. It is grounded in reality, it is not popular and it is not escapism. Ebooks and print on demand publishing allows writers to self publish what is important to them and not writing that has been constrained and reduced by the narrow demands of what is in fashion and will sell. The approach that most excites me is the handmade, which brings individual styles into presenting writing. How a book is presented is part of the story it is aiming to tell, the cover art is the most obvious source of this extension to the story, but, for example, the internal layout, the use of loose pages, of folded maps, can all enhance a reader’s engagement and provide different perspectives to the stories being shared.

2.       The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

The continuing of the above, especially as the same technologies is being used by publishers to reach ever wider audiences for their books. Don’t get me wrong, books published by publishers, on the whole, are worthy of being published, what I don’t like is the selecting of books on certain criteria, especially the focus on making money and therefore risks are not taken on new voices, instead it feels as if they are feared. There is a place for writing that is deemed popular and provides escape, but there is also a place for literature that challenges, that asks of the reader to engage and bring their self into the words and not just be entertained. Writing that challenges is already fading from the popular landscape and this creates a bland landscape for readers, unless they are prepared to search out that writing, as it is out there. Whilst it can be argued nothing is no longer new, certain things will always be new to someone and those experiences are increasingly being denied by the non-existence of, well, new things, which are accessible, especially, writing.

This challenge appears to contradict the excitement captured in the above and that is because it exists, there is a lot to be excited about in literature, but that excitement is tempered by the challenge that new voices in writing face to be heard within a populist culture. There is also the question of society, will ‘we’ on the whole continue to anesthetise our existential boredom or will there be an awakening, a revolution where life is embraced rather than feared and conformed to? If the later then I am excited and see the challenge dispersing, if the former, then with another 100 years of anesthetised existential boredom then popular culture could be very bland and dominated by a particular style of writing that provides escape over challenge.

3.       100 years from now I will be remembered as

Having lived and loved. If my family remembers me then that will do for me as that will mean we have had children, my greatest desire. For a great or great great grandchild to come across my writing and to be excited by it would be wonderful, more so would be to hear memories of my wife, Rach and I and the love between us. I keep promising to write Rach a happy story and instead of writing it, I aim everyday (not always successfully) to live it with her. It may only ever be written in memories.

4.       We think far too little about

Ourselves and each other.

I feel ‘we’ think too much about ourselves in shallow terms, but not deeply. Materialism, success and popularity are equated as happiness and happiness is the goal. Yet happiness is a peak and not a feeling we can sustain and always experience. If ‘we’ reflected on what we truly wanted and satisfied ourselves then we could live contented and unique lives, able to both enjoy happiness and be with sadness. Sadness is not something to fear or avoid, but it appears to be treated that way. If we could be fully with ourselves, then we could perhaps start saying ‘Hello’ to each other again and wouldn’t that be nice. To say ‘Hello’ is the start of treating others as we would like to be treated ourselves, and to treat each other equally is a lot easier when we are treated equally ourselves and valued for our unique self. Now just to explain that to governments and the policy makers.

5.       What is there too much of in the arts?

Popularity contests, which dilutes art. There is a place for it but it currently swamps popular culture. It appears an easy option for both those hosting and broadcasting them, as well as participants and audiences. However there is a sense they reduce art forms to cheap laughs, cute affection and looks. All of which not just cheapens art, but also society. However in response to it, great art may come, art that questions and responds to this status quo, art with a connection to the artist and not just a succession of hopefuls grabbing at their ’15 minutes of fame’, only to be discarded once the industry has had their fill of them.

6.       An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

Banana smoothie please. If you can add some pineapple to it that would be perfect.

7.       Care to elaborate on that?

No problem, I really like pineapple!

As tempting as it would be to torture and take revenge on a person I hate and has caused me upset and pain, I wouldn’t what to waste another second of my time with them, life is too short and finite for that. Instead I would rather have an enjoyable hour, but with who? I don’t really have any icons and my first thought was with my wife, Rach, who is always first in my thoughts if I get extra time or money to spend. However there are a number of musicians, writers and cricketers I would be happy to meet and chat to. It would probably have to be Nick Drake, a fantastic singer-song writer who tragically died too young. It would be great to explore with him his lyrics and unusual guitar tunings. I imagine a mumbling, yet excited, conversation in the corner, with hopefully some guitar playing too.

8.       If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

Decoding static. When I was thinking of a name for my blog, this is the name that popped into my head and describes what my writing is about, the decoding of the noise, the thoughts and the feelings in me. If I ever ran a publishing house I would like to think I would take risks and publish books which were unique, personal and in a sense a decoding of something important to the author.

9.       There should be an app for

I am not fussed by apps, I use them, but don’t go seeking for them. I use a few to connect with others or check sport results and also the news, but I do wonder why I do that when it is a mostly depressing state of affairs, sometimes the sport too! What happens to good news stories? Is there some sort of happy ether somewhere soaking these up or more likely a reflection of the current state of our world? There maybe is my app, something to highlight positive events and experiences; then again we could just look away from our phones and out of the window.

10.   There should never be an app for

Whilst not fussed about apps, I think any tracking app is a no. Give people a sense of tight, ever watchful boundaries and they may withdraw within or away. Give them responsibility for themselves and trust and you have a far greater chance of healthy relationships.

Jared Joseph

1.       The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is

a salad at Yuri’s death

2.       The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

strapped upon the living

3.       100 years from now I will be remembered as

Strapped upon the living

4.       We think far too little about

Soul feeling in its intimacy with nothing

5.       What is there too much of in the arts?

proper narrative thing

6.       An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

I am I AM Exposed to Problems

7.       Care to elaborate on that?

which is to say, infenction, kills helly, sends to heaven

8.       If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

yellow groceries andd treexxs

9.       There should be an app for

If I KLINK KLINK KLINK

10.   There should never be an app for

value

Anna Hobson

1.       The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is

…well, I think I’m a bit of a literary dinosaur, so the world’s increasing love of all things Kindle makes me more attached to the soft-curling pages of a second-hand book, tucked away on one of my many bookshelves. I can get a little carried away about certain things, so when anyone pulls out a lightweight screen with eleven million novels on it, I start banging on about how beautiful books are. They smell great, for starters. Whoever smelled a great 7 inch Android Tablet?

2.       The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

…ensuring technology does not get in the way of words.

3.       100 years from now I will be remembered as ‘that lovely girl who wrote all of that angry, sex stuff’.

4.       We think far too little about

Other people. To the woman who spends two hours a day on her hair removal programme (she exists, I saw it on TV) I suggest spending a couple of weeks in Afghanistan. Or Syria. Or Burma. Or, fuck it, the streets of any city in Britain. You get the idea.

5.       What is there too much of in the arts?

Ego, pretension and talentlessness.

6.       An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

So I have had to re-write this answer following the recent passing of a certain Lady earlier in March. In light of this development, I will revoke my Hostel-type antics and simply settle for a red berry smoothie with Margaret Atwood. And David Attenborough. I’ll always make room for David. Oh and I would have to request that the jazz is turned off. It makes me a bit jittery, and then it would just get me thinking about the cathartic prelude I missed out of respect for the aforementioned Lady.

7.       Care to elaborate on that?

If I do, I’ll probably regret it.

8.       If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

Aztec Orinoco. I have no idea where that came from. In reality, I’d probably call it Purple Publishing, or Make Words Not War. Or something else. My dream is to own the best cattery in the world, with a separate bit of land for the three-legged, one-eyed strays. I wouldn’t have time to run a publishing house.

9.       There should be an app for

Grammar Nazis.

10.   There should never be an app for

Kittens. They’d never have the patience to learn how to use it.

Paul Askew

The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is

There is a lot to get excited about in literature at the moment, if you look hard enough. From the small live lit evenings that are starting to get people taking notice in a variety of forms and styles of writing, right up to the fact that Faber are now publishing genuinely interesting and very good collections of modern poetry from writers like Sam Riviere and Nick Laird. Books by smaller publishers seemingly get much more of a look in these days, and the rise of e-readers and online lit has made self publishing a much easier and less stigmatised thing to do. There may still be some work to do and some way to go, but the literature world does seem to be slowly but surely starting to open up for everyone again.

The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

Who can possibly say? As boring as it is to say, I couldn’t even begin to guess.

100 years from now I will be remembered as

“I didn’t recognise his name, but I had a quick look through and his stuff seemed alright, and it was only a couple of quid in Oxfam, so I thought I’d take a chance, and yeah, it’s pretty weird but it’s alright.”

We think far too little about

This might sound a little contradictory to my answer for the first question, but pushing things forward. Progressing. A lot of writers do seem to get a bit stuck in one particular style or voice, and you can only really get away with that for so long. There’s not enough experimenting, not enough going out of yours or an audience’s comfort zone.

(I am well aware that there may be people I know who read that and say I am guilty of the same thing, and they are probably right.)

What is there too much of in the arts?

Men writing about their dicks and their bowel movements. Women writing pretty flowery imagery and giving a voice to an inanimate object that they once saw. People using swear words or sex as a shock tactic (honestly, it’s 2013 now, can we PLEASE move on from that?). Quirky bios. Poets who don’t actually read poetry. People who think modern creative forms are easy and that you can just do anything without needing to be able justify it. Writers who still write like they’re teenagers.

An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

I honestly don’t see what the point of the latter option would be, whereas the former would be lovely.

Care to elaborate on that?

I recently had the pleasure of having dinner with one of my all-time icons, and it was a really nice experience that I will never forget. Also, I really like smoothies, cafés and jazz.

If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

Sadcore Dadwave, obviously.

There should be an app for

I genuinely can’t think of an app that is needed that someone else won’t have already thought of. Sometimes I lack imagination in life. I am also not very technologically minded.

There should never be an app for

Finding assassins and/or people who will help dispose of a body.

Andrea Coates

1.       The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is
The Freedom from Convention of Form / Content / Character that has opened up since the 20th Century. The Opportunities in MultiMedia Collaboration and Self-Publishing brought on by the Web.

2.       The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

People keep saying, “the Novel is Dead / Literature is Dead.” They are crying Wolf. For Xample: I’m 24, Tech- Savvy, Web-Addicted, Visual Media-Proficient … and I just wrote a Book that is Both Cutting-Edge and a Nod to the Classic, Sweeping Social Novel of the 19th Century. Literature is a aLive and Well and will continue to adapt itSelf to the Times. Literature is a Survivor. Literature is Story written down. My BoyFriend says we may, One Day, move to a post-Literate Society. Maybe. But we’ll still be telling Stories. Story is how Humans have understood who they are, where they come from, and where they are going since the Dawn of Consciousness.

3.       100 years from now I will be remembered as

One of the Greatest Artists of the Early 21st Century. An Icon.

4.       We think far too little about

With what to replace Consumer Capitalism? This is the Big Question of our Time.

5.       What is there too much of in the arts?

What is there too Little of! Politikal Idealism. Instead we have aPathy. Hipsterism is Philosophically Dead – it is Consumerism – a Superficial Aestheticism that is Subservient to the Will of the 1%. It’s so Terribly Boring and Dangerously Complacent.

6.       An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

Jesus. Let’s go with the Nice One, yeah? Who would I pick though? Probably Roberto Bolaño. I’d get a Banana Smoothie with Roberto Bolaño.  I think we would get along. He would Probably find me Funny and Driven and I would find him Attractively Dark and Pure of Vision. It would be a Date, or, if it didn’t start out a Date, it would turn into One. All Admiration, for me, is intertwined with Lust.

7.       Care to elaborate on that?

Use your Imagination.

8.       If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

I have a Media Company called LLWAM: LotusLand Warrior Art Media, so the Publishing Branch, should it come into Xistence, would be called, I think, LLWAM: Books.

9.       There should be an app for

I can’t say I care.

10.   There should never be an app for

To condense Aspects of Life as “Apps” … I think Technology is Cool, and Useful, but at what Point do we forget that there was Life before “Apps” and will be Life after “Apps”? This may sound Really Weird, but I believe I have been in Communication with the Ghost of Steve Jobs. If it was indeed the Ghost of Steve Jobs, if my interActions with the Occult are at All Credible, the Reason his Soul has not yet moved on to the Nxt Dimension is that he was too Connected to “Material Reality.” His Body wasted away because he sacrificed what was the Organic Home of his Soul for these Machines, and now the Machines are acting like Horcruxes, keeping him tied to the Material Plane. He will not get to move on until he clears his Karma by aiding in the disinTegration of a Corrupt Consumer Corporate Culture which he helped build. This makes Sense, Right?

Humphrey Astley

1. The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is

Multiplicity.

2. The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be

Saturation.

3. 100 years from now I will be remembered as

Someone who said something relevant, I hope.

4. We think far too little about

The possibility that a meaningless universe is a great place to find ourselves.

5. What is there too much of in the arts?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xP4wsURn3rw

6. An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?

I thought hard about this. I thought, ‘Whom do I really hate?’ In the end I decided that the most loathsome people deserve pity, not contempt. So I’ll take the banana smoothie with Kurt Vonnegut.
7. Care to elaborate on that?

…And so on.

8. If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?

As a matter of fact I used to run a publishing house called Rain over Bouville (a reference to Jean-Paul Sartre’s Nausea) and am thinking about bringing it back. Watch this space!

9. There should be an app for

Editing poems. Example: ‘Have you considered using fewer adjectives?’

10. There should never be an app for

On second thought, that’s a terrible idea.

Emily Harrison

1. The most exciting thing about literature in the 21st century is… it’s precariousness.

2. The biggest challenge for literature in the 22nd century will be… the internet.

3. 100 years from now I will be remembered as…

Hopefully not ‘as’ anything but instead purely from endless archives of ‘stuff this poet once accidentally got lipstick on’.

4. We think far too little about…
The shorter answers.

5. What is there too much of in the arts?
Blue, and not enough red.

6. An hour with a banana smoothie, a bustling cafe and jazz saxophone to be shared with your all-time icon or an hour in a room with no windows, a full kit of medical and engineering tools, matches, chefs’ knives, kerosene and a blowtorch to be shared with the person you hate most in history?
Anyone I consider would seem the type to be endearingly moody and dissatisfied at anything involving the word ‘bustling’ and I would hope the banana smoothie means one each, because I don’t like sharing.

7. Care to elaborate on that?
I am a full-time lover and only a part-time torturer.

8. If you ran a publishing house, what would it be called?
“Part-Time Torture Press”

9. There should be an app for… No matter what I say I am going to assume that there is someone on the Apple bandwagon, somewhere in the world, already working on it.

10. There should never be an app for… Anything to do with distributing images or videos of cats. Internet, please please please stop this.

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